The longest leg of the triple crown is a historic thoroughbred horse race first run in 1867, named for August Belmont, Sr.

 

Belmont Stakes History

 
Named After August Belmont, Sr., Racehorse Breeder and Sportsman who Financed the First Running

 

The longest leg of the triple crown is a historic thoroughbred horse race first run in 1867, named for August Belmont, Sr., a racehorse breeder and sportsman that financed the first running; who's son August Belmont, Jr., would go on to supervise the construction of Belmont Park in Elmont, New York.

 

Winners of the Belmont participate in many traditions, the winning horse is draped in a blanket of white carnations and the winning owner is presented the August Belmont Trophy.

 

Throughout history, the highly regarded Belmont Stakes has attracted the cream of the thoroughbred horse racing crop, including 12 triple crown winners:

 

Sir Barton (1919)
 

Gallant Fox (1930)
 

Omaha (1935)
 

War Admiral (1937)

 

Whirlaway (1941)
 

Count Fleet (1943)
 

Citation (1948)
 

Secretariat (1973)
 

Seattle Slew (1977)
 

Affirmed (1978)
 

American Pharoah (2015)
 

Justify (2018)

 

Run each year on the first or second Saturday in June, the test of the champion runs on Saturday, June 6 this year; exactly three weeks after the Preakness Stakes and five weeks after the Kentucky Derby.

 

The total purse for the Belmont Stakes is $1.5-MILLION, so ensuring the winning connections receive a payday of $900,000. Post time will be at 6.30p.m. EST., with television coverage on NBC beginning at 5:00p.m., EST.

 

Buying tickets for the Belmont Stakes is eay, with availability ranging from Platinum, Gold and Bronze Clubhouse Packages, to the Garden Terrace or Champagne Room Package.

 

All the above packages offer hospitality and range from $699 to $1,299, premium box seats are also available starting at $425; General admission is $80, including the wristband good for four 12-ounce beers or bottled waters and a trackside view of the far turn, with food trucks and a live DJ.

 

Secretariat set the fastest time in 1973 with a mind blowing 2:24 flat, no other horse in history has ever run less than 2:26.

 

The great Jim McLaughlin notched six out of seven wins between 1882 and 1888, a feat that would remain unmatched until 1955 when champion jockey Edddie Arcaro earned his sixth victory in 15 years, after first winning in 1941.

 

Horseman James G. Rowe Sr., who won eight times as a trainer from 1893 to 1913, also won the race twice as a jockey.

 

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